Episode 409

Leveraging the Power of Virtual Assistants with Greg Brooks

Greg is a partner in Rocket Station and oversees everything business development and marketing. He joined the Rocket Station team with an immense background in sales and entrepreneurship, both in the public and private sectors. He has led teams in many industries including sponsorship, fundraising, consumer packaged goods, military resale, and hospitality. On top of this, he has worked for some of the top Fortune 500 companies as well as having started and sold multiple companies of his own.

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"You can invest 10,000 hours and become an expert or learn from those who have already made that investment." - Jack

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Leveraging-the-Power-of-Virtual-Assistants-with-Greg-Brooks.mp3

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What I find is a lot of people, they don't even get their foot in the race because going back to the consistency of those touchpoints, there's not enough of them to ever establish any type of relationship or rapport some investors make when they're doing cold calling or sending text campaigns.

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They can see.

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But I think there's like that magic thing that they can say, right?

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There's that magic line.

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That'll just the personal realize and boom, contract sign in 20 minutes and we're going.

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I think a lot of what investors miss out on is just having that consistency.

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Welcome to the REI Mastermind Network, where host Jack Hoss gathers amazing stories from leaders in real estate investing.

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In each episode, our guests will tell you what they're doing that works, what they've tried that failed.

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And best of all, you'll learn actionable steps to take your real estate investing to the next.

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Double now here's Jack with another value packed episode.

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We have Greg Brooks with Rocket station and.

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To book a.

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Call with him and his team just for discovery. You can go to discovery.rocketstation.com, but we're going to be talking everything from some sales strategies to virtual.

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Assistance here today, Greg, I really appreciate your time.

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Yeah, Jack, thanks so much for having me as well as the rocket station brand on the podcast.

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I know you're one of the founding partners here.

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It's always cool to run into a company such as yours that focuses on the real estate niche.

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How did your company find its way to real estate investing to provide virtual assistance?

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Yeah, definitely.

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So, our current CEO and original founder of the company, Rob, he was.

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A real estate investor here in Dallas.

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:

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Like a lot of info.

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Masters everyone was number 1, scratching for deals coming out of the market flip, but also, he really internally was looking at different ways of operating the business, having felt one of the hardest times in the real estate industry.

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So, his whole business is born out of he was leveraging virtual assistants based in the Philippines for his own business and.

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Through the mastermind community that real estate is kind of started doing it for friends and colleagues and other operators around the country.

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And approached myself as well as our other partners and was like, hey, we've got something here.

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I think this could be something that we could let the industry needs that there's a big gap and that this could be a product.

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But I'm just not sure how we scale it.

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He was a real estate guy through and through, so I fell into it.

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My background has always been sales business development works for some of the.

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Largest brands in the country coming out of college and establishing my professional career.

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Took a took up roofing concept and brought it to an industry that we felt like really needed it.

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You do any investing yourself?

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I do. I've done.

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A little bit, my wife and I.

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So, we've got, we're up to five properties now.

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We've dabbled in.

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It was a younger couple with a young family, so every house that we've had, and we've owned, we've tried to hold onto it, but we we've got four rentals currently.

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We've got another one that we do short term out of.

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We're here in Dallas, Fort Worth, so it's actually a condo.

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That we do short term, but I have a small portfolio, I say, and especially over the last three years, rocket station has become such a huge part of our time.

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That's really been the core focus Rob he had. He was up to probably about 100 properties when he dove fully into the virtual staffing space, so.

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For the most part, we're very much focused on building this business, staying in touch with the industry, but I've got a small personal.

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Portfolio with all that being said, your CEO, you mentioned that he had some experience using virtual assistants.

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We know that there's other companies that provide this type of service, particularly in the real estate space.

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What itch was he personally scratching there?

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That those other services weren't fitting the need and had forced him to.

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Find alternatives.

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Definitely so, say so Rob, he's very much I would say your typical visionary entrepreneurial CEO in the real estate space, very go getter, very looking forward into the future where his gap was the operational side of it, the process side of the business that I know I've listened to a bunch of your episodes.

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I know that that's a common theme where you get your business to a certain point, but you are the business.

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So, what he took and what we've since turned into a company is the gap that a lot of people within real estate investing have, which is being able to take.

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Their hustle, their work, their grind and scale it into an actual company where whether it's five employees or 50, you're leveraging other people.

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Time to get to your common goal, whatever that is.

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So, our niche within the staffing space is we solve 2 problems for our clients, we help them find real estate trained virtual assistance.

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Which everyone is looking for, right?

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Speeding up that learning curve, whether you're wholesaling, doing subject to syndication, speeding up that learning curve so somebody on the other side of the world can understand what you do and match their talents, their skill set professionally with your business.

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But the thing that's unique about our company is we also help the entrepreneur, help the real estate investor go through that discovery and process mapping phase to say, OK, you're, you're about to prop up a marketing strategy where you need cold callers and people to run your text campaigns and lead managers to follow up and work those leads.

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Let's back into the process.

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The technology, the structure.

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That's somebody who's plugging into that role is going to need to know.

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And what we do for our clients is help get their business out of their heads and create step-by-step soaps, training material, training, documentation so that there's clarity, there's kepis, there's management expectations.

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When you do hire that VA and we view it as a win, win, right, the client.

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Gets the VA that they need because we become very intimate with them.

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We really understand their culture, what they're looking to achieve, what the full scope of work is.

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But then they also get these fully done for you.

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End to end soaps, process maps.

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To hire at scale and really be able to leverage every single virtual assistant that they're hiring.

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It's interesting you focus on that because there's a lot of real estate investors that I've run into that have talked about or leveraged virtual assistants and us included.

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It's more of a black hole where the virtual assistant leaves.

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And now you gotta start all over again.

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Having that documentation is pretty vital.

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And I feel like especially in real estate, it's had a great acquisition team or a great acquisition manager.

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Then that acquisition manager leaves because they realize, hey, I could do this for myself and the real estate investor, the entrepreneur, the owner who's doing a million different things.

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Is left with that gap right where it's.

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I don't know what they were doing, how they did it, how do we use our CRM, our platform?

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And we feel.

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Like a lot of those pain points that entrepreneurs feel as they're building their companies can be avoided.

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If you start first at process clearly defined outcomes and then hire people, we use about ugly metaphor of you could have a business that's growing at scaling.

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But what?

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What if Johnny stepped out of your office and got hit by a bus tomorrow?

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But do you have processes where you could backfill and take care of that role and scale it up quickly?

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And the scary thing is, a lot of investors don't write.

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They hire really good people.

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They dump a lot of.

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Really tangible time into.

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Them, but there's no documentation, there's no scale.

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So, whether they're growing, whether they're replacing.

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Whether they're hiring VAs, there's really no path forward other than I'm going to sit here for the next six months.

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I'm going to teach you everything I know, and then, fingers crossed, hopefully you never leave my business.

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Now one of the VA experiences I have was more towards a pool of VAs that are just being fed forms.

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We actually had to develop a form and then the VA is just reading it off or there was no intimate knowledge of the actual business.

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It was just regurgitating what was on the screen.

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But you're talking a more.

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Build 1 on one relationship.

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Associated with your visas.

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So, our model is fully dedicated, meaning our team members either work for our client's part time or full time, but we want them to feel like they're a part of your investment company in Dallas or New York or Boise ID.

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We really view it as a global workforce that that investors are really able to tap.

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Into and we feel like you get.

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The best results #1.

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When you're working day-to-day with somebody, right, where VA isn't essentially just pulling up a script last minute and making cold calls and submitting a form that goes into your CRM, right, there's not a lot of personalization.

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That can go in there whether it's understanding your local market, understanding your strategies that you're using and offering to your potential sellers.

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So, there's only so much you can do when it's scripted, but we also feel like for the investor, when you have that level of personalization, there's so much more you can do with your virtual assistant, meaning they don't just have to be your cold caller.

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Who's doing 8 hours or calls a day?

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They can be working your leads that are in for follow up.

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They can be running your text campaign, layering your marketing in.

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Because that's in their sales skill set, right?

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So, we feel like you really gain that intimate connection with them where they feel like a member of the team, but then you're you as the owner are able to get so much more out of them because you've got these clearly defined processes, but because they're working for you each and every day and you're not just utilizing them as essentially a data input or on your.

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People form as entrepreneurs; we're looking for ways to obviously scale.

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And this is like the first stop is taking on an assistant locally or looking at the Virtual assistant world.

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And I'm going.

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To guess, speaking for entrepreneurs, I'm going to say that most of us are looking for some guidance and suggestions regarding the scaling aspect.

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I would imagine that to scale in your business you are probably adopting certain processes and procedures and recommendations.

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Whether it's recommending certain creams or certain other tools to keep this process smooth, what are some of those tools or processes that you recommend or try to incorporate right away?

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Yeah, no, definitely it's we're very fortunate I would say for anybody looking to use an agency like ours.

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That is one of the benefits.

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That you get if you work.

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e have currently we have over:

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What I would.

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Say specific to the investing space is a.

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Lot of our clients come.

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In and it's a transaction based.

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Game, right.

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So, you've got to keep that pipeline full.

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You've got to.

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Be able to work.

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Your leads, you've got to be able to layer in, you know, 234 different marketing strategies. Well, how do you do that affordably?

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And how do you do that without sucking time out of your acquisitions manager or your acquisitions team?

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Because let's be honest, if you hire somebody most of the time locally to close deals for you, but also do cold prospecting and also handle the follow up like it's just it's too much and it's they're going to prioritize their time to where they.

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Get paid so.

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We're fortunate that we have a lot of relationships and great partners.

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To name a few, freedom soft REI black book investor, fuse.

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So, there's a lot of great technology out there just on the acquisition kind of CRM side that really allow you to tap into virtual assistance, maintain a lot of control within the business, but also really make sure your pipeline is being worked top down.

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Bottom consistently and I think technology in making that that transition for somebody, we'd still have clients that do use Google Sheets and use Excel sheets to track leads and lead lists.

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I think that the transition to technology is really invaluable, whether you're talking about, hey, I want to hire VA so that I don't have to be the guy who's doing follows up calls where I can be the.

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Business owner and focus on the strategy.

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Or if you're talking hiring a team of 50 to go into six new markets, right.

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The technology piece is so crucial and what we really help our clients maximize that by getting the most out of the tools that they're using, but then also ensuring that their teams have the most up-to-date training, have all their dashboards, their KPIs set up to where you can really maximize.

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Atul and understand.

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And when you're spending money on marketing or when you're spending money on a new campaign or new market, like what the cost benefit of that is and whether that strategy is working and makes sense?

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Or whether it is.

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Everybody likes the idea of scaling, but sometimes it's maybe putting the cart before the horse.

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Like, what should entrepreneurs be asking themselves prior to engaging a company?

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Such as?

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For sure.

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So, for us, I think you always want to look at is really where are we, right?

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Are we at the point where we are still very much someone who's in the day today and how we realize that in order to get the most out of ourselves?

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But those within our organization, we need to develop these processes and clearly defined these outcomes and a lot of what that backs into its what are.

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Your KP eyes, what are your numbers?

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I think the other part, there's a lot of people just because of the cost of VAs when you compare it.

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To hiring someone onshore.

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They can view.

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It was like very safe or sometimes a very cheap alternative to hiring people locally, whereas they haven't backed into the process of the technology.

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They don't really it, hey, I want to go open a new market here.

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They don't really understand what their strategy is.

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To go in there.

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So, what I would say for a lot.

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Of investors that.

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We work with and what we really look for.

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When we're trying to partner with a client, because we really do view it as a partnership, is you shouldn't look at VAs strictly as a cost saving, saving measure.

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There definitely is a component of that.

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It definitely can be a lot more economical.

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But you shouldn't.

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If there's a lot of services out there, there's a lot of people out there gurus out there that tout off the done for you, it's all done for you.

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Well, just business is never, it's never that easy.

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So, you need to look at where you're at from a time standpoint.

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Do you have?

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The time to make an investment in the individual or in the process so you can clearly define these outcomes.

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And get the results that you want, but.

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Then more importantly.

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Not viewing the VA as just the easy button 'cause its people, right?

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Whether you're a VA that you're a New York based business and they live in Florida.

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Or whether they're in the Philippines, you need to invest time in your team.

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You need to give clarity.

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You need to be that strategic leader for them.

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And I think where people can fall into the trap as they jump into VA's, because on a lot of these podcasts, on a lot of the mastermind classes, you need a VA. If you don't have a VA, get a VA.

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But there isn't that connection that, hey, it's a person, there's going to need to be outcomes, there's going to need to be accountability, there's going to need to be coaching.

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So, unless you're at the point of your business where you can invest a little bit of time on the front end to go through process mapping, to sit there and listen to calls and give coaching points, I think you're probably not quite at the point where you're ready to that jump in and make that hire at least by yourself.

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And that you should either look to create the processes and clearly.

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Define why you think you need this BA or work with a service provider who has a track record of helping you as the entrepreneur.

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Get through that process so you can fast track hiring your first or your 5th.

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Yeah, it sounds like your virtual assistance are very customized to that individual business, but there's going to be some guardrails there somewhere.

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What are some of those things?

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Let's rein in the expectations here.

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What can they do?

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What can't they do?

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Yeah, definitely.

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So, we break this up, we say strategic or tactical we feel like.

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A lot of VA.

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And where people can be very, they can really leverage, and lean is stick to the tactical positions within your company.

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At least to start.

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Meaning the cold caller who has their script and can become familiar with their services, but they're really asking 5 or 6 qualifying questions.

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Or they're the lead manager who can go into the task and send the follow up text or make the follow up call.

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Or maybe in underwriting, they can go look at the 678 data points that you do when you're evaluating deals and be able to input on them.

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I think where a lot of people mess up is they want it.

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They want to get rid of what they're not good at as the business owner and sometimes.

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That dabbles into the strategic the decision making.

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But hey, what market should we go into, what, what strategy should be using? And what I can say is a lot of the data in the day-to-day work.

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% of that job done. Put:

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But you as.

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The business owner should always hold on to the strategic side of the business.

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I think very process driven; very task-based work is really where people can make very quick wins.

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With VAs and.

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Don't get me wrong, we're a company that we've got 250 almost team members in the Philippines.

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That work for us.

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We have strategic thinkers.

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We have our operations team over there that that make decisions on behalf of our company to help us grow in scale.

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But for most investors where there's a lot going on when you're making your initial hire or where you're trying to go into.

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A new market?

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Resourcing out those very operational heavy, those very time heavy, very task-based roles is the best quick win that investors can make when they're leveraging Fiat.

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Just remind everybody, head over to Discovery dot rocket station.

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Com and I'll make sure to have that link in the show notes so you can click over directly to have a one-on-one conversation with Greg and his team.

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But before somebody engages with you, Greg, I'm sure they're going to be asking what are some of the questions they should be asking just.

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To make sure.

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It's a good fit.

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fact that we go through about:

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Or when you're putting a job posting on.

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Online jobs, pH or Upwork?

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Ask those questions or make sure you're opening your applicant pool up to a lot of people.

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So, you want to understand, what is your recruitment?

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What is your process that everybody goes through?

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How are you vetting?

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And then once it comes to the hiring piece a.

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Lot of people focus.

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On hey, we're about to create a cold.

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We're going to do a cold calling campaign in this market.

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Or, hey, I'm, I'm mailing out 12,000 postcards and I know that there's gonna be a flood and they worry a lot on the job itself, but they don't paid that much mind into the management or the kepis or the tracking that comes with, you know, hiring and employing virtual assistants. So, I think you always want to either if you're doing it yourself.

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Know your KPIs and know who's going to manage it on your team and know how you're going to be able to dump those reports out of your CRM or how you're going to.

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Do your daily accountability calls.

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Or if you're using an agency like ours, really ask them like, OK, perfect, you're going to get me somebody, then what?

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What can I expect from your service on an ongoing basis?

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How often am I going to hear from you?

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What KPIs do you have?

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What are your best packed practice metrics for this role or this job function?

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Because unfortunately a lot of companies fulfill the staffing agency part of it.

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But the hard part is, yes, finding people.

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It's managing people.

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Right.

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Business to business.

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Having a business isn't.

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That hard?

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It's usually the people part of it that's the hardest.

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So, understanding what the support ongoing is and you know either whether it's a referral or having them show you their process and their management KPIs get an understanding for what you're going to get from that partner on an ongoing basis or are they truly just?

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A matchmaker where the hey, I need VA with XYZ skill set and then it's on you.

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Those are big decisions when you talk about yes, a VA for 5 bucks, 10 bucks, 15 bucks an hour can be very enticing to a business owner.

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But if you work with that VA or VA for six months and you don't get any output and.

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You end up having to.

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Fire them.

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You know what's more valuable there?

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So, understanding what they do from a vetting and due diligence and training perspective, but also what they have in place from an infrastructure management wise.

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It's going to help not just you as a as a client, but help the Villiers be successful.

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You know, day today is I think, a big piece that a lot of people miss when they jump in with Villiers that they ends up biting them on the.

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Backside, as entrepreneurs were always looking at, I put it in two buckets.

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We're looking for the return on investment or return.

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Time there are balance between those two.

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Could you give us an example of somebody that you've been working with one of those partnerships as a real estate investor and how you were able to help them scale to provide that ROI?

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Yeah, definitely. So, we.

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Worked with a client out of out of Utah.

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He buys in Utah, Arizona, a little bit in California had.

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Used VHS has used every company that's ever been out there, and their biggest complaint was that it was, hey, there was a lot of onus on us.

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They brought us a lot of people. They always had people, but then managing A-Team and currently our team with them.

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Is they've got 11 of RP.

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People doing cold calling, outbound text messaging as well as lead management and I think it was drawing that parallel to them that.

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Yes, we're not the company that's going to come and say we'll have you a VA in 48 hours.

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We just feel like that's not setting anybody up for success.

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It's not setting your business up for success.

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It's not setting the VA, who's committed to a job he was employed up for success.

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So, what we do with that client was we.

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Put them through our.

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On boarding it takes about 2 1/2.

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Three weeks did full process discovery.

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We recommended a better dialer.

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There was a disconnect between their CRM and the daughter that they were using that was causing them to miss data pass throughs.

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There was integrations within their CRM that they didn't even realize that was there, that allowed them to automate certain pieces of the process that they had intentions of having a VA manually do so from there started.

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They started with two callers as a sample test, like a lot of investors out there had been burned multiple times, had a couple good days, had a lot of bad ones, and since then we've been able to scale their team to well over 10 people and that team itself is making about 25,000 outbound dial.

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As well as sending about 40,000 texts every single month and it's resulting from the client, it's resulting in about four to five incremental deals that otherwise they weren't bringing in.

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So, I think it's looking.

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Don't ever look for that.

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Fast solution.

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And we want to really.

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Get in deep.

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With our clients really help flush out those processes whether they're clear and established.

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Or whether you've just run a good operation and now you're trying to take that.

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Next step so.

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Much of what we try to help our clients with is yes people, but really helping them refine the process because.

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Most of what happens that bottlenecks our companies, it's usually not big strategic pieces, right.

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It's usually the day-to-day operations, the very process driven work that causes us to not take opportunity or not pivot quick enough to take advantage of the crazy market that we're all.

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Dealing with right now.

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and I think you said you had:

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Is at this point, what are some of the low hanging fruits?

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If somebody is a one-man band or they're considering a virtual assistant for that first time, where are some of the places that they should focus on those transactional activities that seem to provide the biggest return?

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Right now, so a.

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Lot of what we see in where we are, our clients who are the one or two person show, a lot of it comes down to the management of themselves, their calendar, their inbox, their e-mail, setting up their software correctly, their CRM's, they're dialers, their text platforms. A lot of that. I say a lot of people spend a.

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Lot of time watching the YouTube.

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Tutorials or trying to clean out their inbox and get things filtered and respond where you could have a VA very quickly plug in and be able to handle that just to put time back in your.

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arm of our business, probably:

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There's some type of lead generation activity because for most investors of what a lot of people don't realize is it holds true in sales.

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On average, it takes about 17 touch points to get a decision out of a prospect, right and.

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A lot of the clients we work with, they don't come.

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Anywhere near close to three or four.

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Touch points, right?

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So, if you're the investor out there who you're the one making the cold calls or doing the dials or doing the follow-ups or sending the.

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That's a lot of work that's very process driven that even if you feel like you do a good job of it.

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Number one it's.

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Holding you back.

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From the true revenue generating activities or it's holding you back from being the visionary to find the next market or try the next strategy or go to the next mastermind to learn from some of the greats out there. But #2, you're probably not even coming anywhere close.

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From a touchpoint standpoint to really make sure that you're juicing as much of that.

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Fruit out of a market that's being constructed right now.

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So, I always think.

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From for investors out.

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There lead generation is always the best place to start just because you gotta keep that pipeline full and you need to have quality consistent touchpoints as well as you need to manage those leads within your technology and most investors.

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Just because they're on the go or they're picking up a call while they're in.

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The car while.

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They're trying.

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To get the kids from school, it's just it's not feasible to have consistency in it and at the end.

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Of the day.

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To make any strategy profitable, you've got.

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To have the consistency.

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If you're throwing the kitchen sink at the wall every couple months, you're never even going to have the numbers to understand the cost benefit of strategies or coaching or tools that you're using because you're not fully exhausting the data that you've.

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Got with all that being said, there's some even on that lead generation, there's some sales strategy.

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That some of us would like to incorporate and unfortunately when it comes to virtual assistance that I've experienced, any way that it's anything beyond that script is lost or to the wayside, do you find that is something that?

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Could be trained and you could get a VA to think outside the script here and there.

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Or is it?

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Yeah, no, definitely.

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And what I would say, scripting it definitely has its place in terms of speed, right, in terms of getting somebody up and consistently getting those qualifying answers out of them where I feel like.

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A lot of.

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Investors, because they just don't have the time.

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It's that contextual kind of Y information.

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A lot of people forget it for us where our teams.

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Are on the.

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Philippines there's no really real estate investing.

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The way it's done here in the.

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US in the Philippines. I'm from Canada. You can't even deploy many of the strategies that people do here in the US just.

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North of the border.

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So, what we do to help expedite that is.

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Through the training.

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And evaluation that we do with the VA, which takes place over about 6 1/2 weeks.

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Before they ever go on an interview with a client is give them the contextual information around not just the real estate industry and the investment industry, but the individual strategies on a lot of our clients use.

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Whether it's the burst strategy, whether it's land flipping, whether it's wholesaling, sub two, we go through and help them understand like, hey, when you're picking up the phone.

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Most of the time you're not calling.

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You know it's not a B-to-B sale, right?

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You're calling someone that for most of the time they've landed.

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On a list.

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And here's the types of reasons or distress points that they're probably going through.

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And here's how you need to then frame that call.

::

A lot of people are out there looking for the ninja clothes or the ninja salesperson.

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What I find is.

::

Is a lot of people.

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They don't even get their foot in the race because going back to the consistency of those touch points, there's not enough of them to ever establish any type of relationship or rapport some investors make when they're doing cold calling or sending text campaigns.

::

They think there's like that magic thing that they can say, right?

::

There's that magic line that'll just the personal realize and boom.

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Contract sign in 20 minutes and we're going.

::

I think a lot of what investors miss out on is just having that consistency.

::

So, getting the VA off script comes from investing in the training, right?

::

Both us as well as the client giving them get the contextual information to understand.

::

Who and why they're reaching out to this person.

::

But then it also just comes from the fact that they're able to make the 8th, 9th, 10th call that they're able to send the text message, follow up and really establish that relationship, which a lot of investors they don't.

::

It's always the new list, the hot list, make the next call, get to the next lead and we forget about that 80% of our list that might not be ready now.

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But if we're just in the right place at the right time, you know, that becomes a prospective deal for us.

::

What I was getting at is where I struggled previously is that I wanted more of the why is somebody trying to sell?

::

And then it was almost jarring because anytime I would give a Y type question to ask, the next question is how many beds and baths you are building report to a certain extent because you're asking the why and then you're.

::

Jarring that individual into some other information and you lose that.

::

And then the other aspect was setting the stage because we always send somebody on site eventually just to review or take a look, just to establish certain expectation.

::

So going off script here and there, it just makes sense and makes things just more human and transactional.

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Yeah, definitely.

::

And then part of that too plays in for us anyways the dedicated model, it's we view the team member as a member of your team, we want our clients and.

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We encourage them.

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To have them on their sales calls.

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The coaching call.

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Just daily catch ups to establish that relationship.

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That could be working for fives.

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7-8 other people doing the same calls, working in a bunch of different scripts trying to meld it all together to be successful.

::

So that's where we really feel like the.

::

One-on-one gets the best results.

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'cause number one.

::

It creates coaching moments, right?

::

When all those little kinds of nuanced pieces to train and educate and teach your team members the why, it creates very controlled platforms.

::

You know.

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Or we can do that, but then it also creates familiarity with your product, right? If you're somebody who it's like we have clients, it depends on where they're at in the pipeline, but we have clients that utilize their VA's just to ask those five qualifying questions.

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And be very basically, hey, would you be interested in an offer if we came in at this, just to gauge simple motivations. We have other clients who want the VA's to take the deal a little bit farther than that and write and build the rapport and understand what happened here.

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How did this happen?

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What's the situation?

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And just be the person that listens to them for 20 minutes to build that rapport, right, 'cause that's what happens.

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On those calls, you really dive in deep with them.

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So we always.

::

Look at what the client outcome is and what the purpose is that they're using.

::

But we feel like that dedicated model where you're mixing well trained individuals.

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With clearly defined processes at scripting but then also creating those coaching moments is really where people can best maximize their VAs ending, where we have an upper edge to help our clients get there so they can just have a really well-oiled team that does.

::

That form.

::

I know the answer to this next one is probably going to be closer to it depends, but what type of return on investment?

::

Have you been seeing?

::

And if somebody puts a dollar into a virtual assistance, what would they see as a?

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Return for sure.

::

So, I don't have the dollar-by-dollar breakdown, but what I do have for you.

::

So, within the 1st 90 days of engagement with us, so you start with the VA within the 1st 3.

::

We've done a lot of studies.

::

Within our clients, our average number is 2 to 5.

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So, our clients report back to us within the 1st 90 days, their virtual team members directly responsible for anywhere from 2 to 5 incremental deals that they wouldn't have otherwise done.

::

deal, it could be a $:

::

Wait, that's the numbers we see. And from having the two to five number for most people, when you're talking about a $10.00 an hour VA, which is what carbs are, that's one extra deal for the most part.

::

For most people that pays for them for a year, right?

::

So, it creates a lot of opportunity really at minimal overhead for that.

::

Kind of leads me to the next question is what would?

::

Somebody expect you said you could hire somebody part or full time.

::

Do you mind sharing what are those typically running?

::

Yeah, for sure.

::

And obviously to do a shameless plug again, discovery.rocketstation.com for anybody that wants to dive in a little bit deeper.

::

But our pricing is all flat rates.

::

So, whether you're hiring a lead Gen, a cold caller, whether you're hiring someone for the transaction.

::

Coordination type role. Social.

::

Media SEO part time for us is $12.00.

::

Flat rate per hour, minimum 20 hours per week.

::

So, we feel like that's the minimum that interaction that we can have on a dedicated capacity where the VA can still be very plugged into our client's business and then we have the full-time option which is your full 40-hour week work week and.

::

That's the $10 flat rate.

::

Per hour.

::

OK.

::

Greg, this has been a great conversation, but I do have a few rapid-fire questions if you want to.

::

Give them a shot.

::

Yeah, go ahead, fire away.

::

So, here's a chance for you to bust a real estate investing myth that you might have heard on late night programming.

::

What is a myth you'd like to bust here?

::

be compared to what it was in:

::

Just with a lot of our clients.

::

Operating, I think there's definitely a contraction happening, but for the people that are prepared for it, that are ready for it, I think there's a huge opportunity.

::

Ready for people to gain market share, especially when you talk about the localized small, small, smaller time investor.

::

I think there's tons of opportunity out there in various markets across the country.

::

Sure, what book would you recommend?

::

Or what are you currently reading today?

::

But you're not allowed to say rich Dad, poor dad, or think.

::

And grow rich.

::

It's funny that you say that was like my intro that.

::

And I think.

::

The grant Cardone 10X and I'll give you a better one.

::

We are big, we're big, Simon, Sinek fans, myself, as well as my partners.

::

But we're actually, I just opened up a book called Think again, highly encourage everybody if you're just got that place in your.

::

Business where you're looking to.

::

Make a big step or.

::

You feel stuck.

::

It's one of those.

::

Books that can really help you through that time in an entrepreneur's journey, whether you're on either side of that spectrum?

::

So, think again.

::

Highly encourage it.

::

What is the biggest business mistake you've made and what did you learn from it?

::

Biggest business mistake I made was coming out of college I thought I was going to.

::

Be the next athletic director.

::

Of some major university and quickly realize that I don't have the patience for bureaucracy and higher Ed and.

::

I was with my sales background. Making 21 grand A year was just not something that I really wanted to do for the next 10 years.

::

I filled a lot of.

::

Time trying to find my way in that path to, you know what, the entrepreneurial sides probably better fit for me, and then I should probably try to be my own boss rather than deal with 14 levels of bureaucracy and a higher Ed organization.

::

And is there a question or concept you wish we would have?

::

Covered here today, I think one thing that I really am enjoying jumping in with people on is the new globalized workforce.

::

Obviously, we did touch that talking about, but I think it's a very interesting concept whether it's geographic.

::

Geographically within your country.

::

Or different skill sets around the world.

::

I think it's something that if you dive in deep, there's a lot of, there's a lot of opportunity for people to really leverage talent that even just five years ago you never would have thought you could get someone with.

::

That skill set I had read an article just today talking about some large corporations now aren't.

::

Hiring based on geographic locations.

::

They're basing it on ZIP codes or time zones, so it is becoming a thing.

::

Now just let's face fact, I don't think we're ever going to come out of this working from home situation and in turn this global workforce.

::

Greg, I really appreciate it. One more time discovery.rocketstation.com and I'll make sure to have that link in the show notes, but I hope you come back again sometime. This was great.

::

Yeah. Thank you so.

::

Much for fine, we appreciate it.

::

If you learned at least one actionable step to incorporate into your real estate investing if so, please consider returning some of that value by leaving a positive review, subscribing to our YouTube channel, or joining our growing network on Facebook and Twitter.

::

You can find links to all of our social media accounts in the show notes. See you next time.